TETON AREA FORECAST
Issued at 01/14/2020 05:52   Valid until: 01/14/2020 23:59
CURRENT CONDITIONS (Mountain Weather Past 24 Hours)
At 10,400' Elevation 5 AM Temp Max Temp Avg Wind Dir Avg. Wind Speed Max Wind Gust
Rendezvous Summit 10 º F 10 Southwesterly 27 59
Location Elevation Snowfall/Prec. Total Snow Depth Total Snowfall
Raymer Plot 9,300' 13"/ 1.14 89" 248"
Rendezvous Bowl 9,580' 10"/ 0.90" 90" 264"
Chief Joseph Plot 8,800' 7"/ 0.60" 90" 222"
Mountain Weather Forecast for Today
Snow is expected throughout the day and could be heavy at times.
Temperature forecast for 8,000 - 9,000: Rising into the upper teens.
Ridge Top Wind Forecast for 10,000´: Southwesterly at 25-35 mph.
Snowfall Expected Next 24 Hours : 8-10
GENERAL AVALANCHE HAZARD
Elevation Morning Rating Afternoon Rating
High Elevations (9,000´-10,500´) 4-HIGH 4-HIGH
Mid Elevations (7,500´-9,000´) 4-HIGH 4-HIGH
Low Elevations (6,000´-7,500´ 2-MODERATE 2-MODERATE
General Avalanche Advisory
Yesterday's very strong winds and continued snowfall has formed soft to hard slabs on a variety of aspects and elevations. Additional snowfall and strong winds that will occur today will add to this surface slab problem and will also further load deep weaknesses in the snowpack. At the mid and high elevations, natural avalanche activity will be likely involving both the new and the deep layers. Backcountry travel is not recommended in these areas. At lower elevations, identify steep terrain features where loading has occurred and be aware of the run out zones of large avalanche paths. A deep slab is reported to have occurred yesterday in Drew's Slide to the south of the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort.

TODAY'S AVALANCHE PROBLEMS

TYPE OF PROBLEM
ASPECT/ELEVATION
Wind Slab
Avalanche problem rose
CHARACTERISTICS
LIKELIHOOD
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
SIZE
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
TREND
Increasing trend
DESCRIPTION
Very strong south to southwest winds and new snow have formed wind slabs in steep leeward terrain at all elevations. These slabs lie upon recent density breaks within the upper portion of the snowpack and could have depths of up to three feet. They could release naturally today, particularly at the higher elevations as they are further loaded by new and blowing snow and will sensitive to backcountry travelers all day.
TYPE OF PROBLEM
ASPECT/ELEVATION
Persistent Deep Slab
Avalanche problem rose
CHARACTERISTICS
LIKELIHOOD
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
SIZE
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
TREND
Increasing trend
DESCRIPTION
Approximately ten inches of moisture has fallen since the start of the new year. Dangerous, deep, hard slabs could fail from the impact of a triggered wind slab or possibly by the weight of a single person hitting a weak spot on a slope. These slabs could fail on two distinct weak layers. The higher layer was buried at the start of the new year and could release with depths of two to four feet at the upper elevations and with depths to two feet at the lower elevations. This buried weak layer lies on a variety of aspects and is made up of surface hoar, buried faceted snow, and on south facing aspects, crusts. A deeper pronounced weak layer was buried on November 25th. This hazard is limited to north facing terrain at 8000 feet and as elevation increases, involves more aspects. At 9500 feet west, north and east facing slopes can have this weakness. If triggered, slabs involving this layer could have depths to six feet.
For further information call 307-733-2664 To report an avalanche observation call 307-739-2607