TETON AREA FORECAST
Issued at 12/02/2019 05:50   Valid until: 12/02/2019 23:59
CURRENT CONDITIONS (Mountain Weather Past 24 Hours)
At 10,400' Elevation 5 AM Temp Max Temp Avg Wind Dir Avg. Wind Speed Max Wind Gust
Rendezvous Summit 18 º F 18 Southwesterly 17 41
Location Elevation Snowfall/Prec. Total Snow Depth Total Snowfall
Raymer Plot 9,300' 2"/ 0.13 35" 74"
Rendezvous Bowl 9,580' 2"/ 0.15" 44" 88"
Chief Joseph Plot 8,800' 2"/ 0.16" 41" 75"
Mountain Weather Forecast for Today
Expect light to moderate snowfall and strong southwesterly ridgetop winds throughout the day as southwesterly flow aloft brings a Pacific disturbance into the region.
Temperature forecast for 8,000 - 9,000: Rising into the mid 20s.
Ridge Top Wind Forecast for 10,000´: Southwesterly at 15 to 25 miles per hour.
Snowfall Expected Next 24 Hours : 6 to 10.
GENERAL AVALANCHE HAZARD
Elevation Morning Rating Afternoon Rating
High Elevations (9,000´-10,500´) 3-CONSIDERABLE 3-CONSIDERABLE
Mid Elevations (7,500´-9,000´) 3-CONSIDERABLE 3-CONSIDERABLE
Low Elevations (6,000´-7,500´ 1-LOW 1-LOW
General Avalanche Advisory
Dangerous avalanche conditions exist at the mid and upper elevations. Up there, skiers and riders choosing to venture into steep terrain are likely to trigger large to very large persistent slab avalanches. As the day progresses, the likelihood of triggering these slabs will be on the increase. Numerous human triggered and natural avalanches occurred on Saturday, one of which resulted in a partial burial. Excellent terrain evaluation skills and conservative choices will be essential for safe travel in avalanche terrain. Monitor wind loading and new snowfall throughout the day and be willing to alter your travel plans if conditions warrant.

TODAY'S AVALANCHE PROBLEMS

TYPE OF PROBLEM
ASPECT/ELEVATION
Persistent Slab
Avalanche problem rose
CHARACTERISTICS
LIKELIHOOD
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
SIZE
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
TREND
Increasing trend
DESCRIPTION
Persistent weak layers, which include faceted snow near the base of the snowpack and buried surface hoar, exist in terrain that held snow prior to Sunday November 24th. This terrain generally includes all aspects above 9,000 feet and northerly slopes down to 8,000 feet. Skiers and riders venturing into these areas are likely to trigger slab avalanches up to three feet deep, and natural activity will be possible. New snowfall, snow available for transport and strong winds will exacerbate this hazard throughout the day. Knowledge of the extent and distribution of the faceted weak layers of concern will be essential for accurate terrain evaluation.
For further information call 307-733-2664 To report an avalanche observation call 307-739-2607