SOUTHWEST TRAILS/GREY'S RIVER AREA FORECAST

Issued at 02/15/2019 07:14   Valid until: 02/15/2019 23:59

CURRENT CONDITIONS (Mountain Weather Past 24 Hours)
At 10,400' Elevation 5 AM Temp Max Temp Avg Wind Dir Avg. Wind Speed Max Wind Gust
Mt Coffin 16 º F 24 West-Southwesterly 22 59
View Temperature and Wind Graphs View Mt Coffin 48 Hr Wind Graph
Location Elevation Snowfall/Prec. Total Snow Depth Total Snowfall
Comissary Ridge Plot 9,330' 12"/ 1.00 89" 257"
Blind Bull Meadow Plot 9,000' 11"/ 1.00" 72" 189"
Box Y Ranch Plot 6,300' 7"/ 0.69" 54" 115"
Mountain Weather Forecast for Today
Skies will be mostly overcast with light snowfall in the morning and an increase in snowfall intensity during the passage of a cold front this afternoon.
Temperature forecast for 8,000 - 9,000  
Temperatures will rise into the 20s in the mountains and be near freezing at the lowest elevations
Ridge Top Wind Forecast for 10,000´
Westerly winds will veer to towards the northwest at 20 to 30 with gusts to 50 miles per hour.
Snowfall Expected Next 24 Hours
5 to 10
General Avalanche Advisory
Conditions are still dangerous at all elevations. In the mountains storm cycle totals since early Sunday morning are as much as three feet with 3 inches of moisture. This new snow and strong winds are loading a snowpack that has poor snow structure and buried persistent weak layers. Yesterday the freezing level rose to around 7,500 feet and the lower elevations experienced a rain/snow mix. Several wet slides occurred in the river canyons last night. Temperatures are slightly cooler this morning. A cold front is forecast to pass through the region this afternoon. Natural avalanche activity is possible at all elevations. Human triggered avalanches are likely on steep avalanches prone slopes. Roof slides are possible. Expert snow stability and terrain evaluation skills are essential for safe travel in avalanche terrain.

Today's Avalanche Problems

Wind Slab

ASPECT/ELEVATION
Avalanche problem rose
CHARACTERISTICS
LIKELIHOOD
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
SIZE
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
TREND
Increasing trend

DESCRIPTION

Large slab avalanches formed by southwest to west winds are likely to be triggered by humans who venture into steep wind loaded avalanche starting zones. These slabs could be 1 to 3 feet deep. Natural releases are possible, especially during the frontal passage.

Persistent Slab

ASPECT/ELEVATION
Avalanche problem rose
CHARACTERISTICS
LIKELIHOOD
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
SIZE
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
TREND
Steady trend

DESCRIPTION

Large to very large slab avalanches could fail on persistent weak layers. At the mid and upper elevations these slabs could be 2 to 5 feet deep. At the lower elevations these slabs could be wet and fail to the ground with depths to four feet.
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